Pete's Pics
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St Augustine FL
July 26, 2008
Pete's Pics > St Augustine FL
 
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Looking south on St George Street from Hypolita, the bell tower of the cathedral can be seen. The entire old town has been largely renovated and much of the property appears to be owned by the city


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Building styles and materials vary widely along St Georges street with a smattering of residential among the eateries and other tourist stores


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More attractive buildings on north St George


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Rodriguez Avero Sanchez house, a sergeant in the Spanish army, had this house built around 1762


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St. Photios Greek Orthodox National Shrine, an institution of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America. Dedicated to the first colony of Greeks who came to America in 1768


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A section of St Georges street is known as the Colonial Spanish Quarter and is a blend of museum and living history village centered around the 1740s


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Production values are high enough that authenticity takes a back seat. The "Buy Tickets Here" booth is not original


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How much of this can be believed is anyone's guess. Interesting, if rather fanciful wheel support


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An artesian well producing adequate water flow with a 10 foot head is also a little dubious when there is no high ground for 50 miles around. Poetic license or similar, one supposes


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The carefully qualified (and undated) "oldest wood school house in the USA". Looks like the building next door came straight from Lowes


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In the school house backyard stands this homey shack. I think someone must keep trying to steal the chimney since it has been chained up


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Lo, an Authentic Old Drugstore! Even on the authentic looking signs it is known as the Old Drug Store - what could it have been called when it was new?


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This gruesome edifice is the Grace United Methodist Church. An example of Spanish Renaissance Revival Style, the church was dedicated in 1888 having been largely lavishly constructed in poured concrete


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Just around the corner is the Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church, an example of the Venetian Renaissance style. Built by entrepreneur Henry Flagler in memory of his daughter, Jennie Louise, who died at sea en route to St. Augustine in 1889


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Henry Morrison Flagler, 1830 – 1913, was an American tycoon, real estate promoter, railroad developer and Rockefeller partner in Standard Oil. A key figure in the development of the eastern coast of Florida along the Atlantic Ocean he is also known as the father of Miami, Florida


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Despite the cheery exterior, the church is extremely dark inside, having few windows


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On the next block across the street is the Flagler College and Library in the same gory Spanish Renaissance style as the Methodist church although the overall effect is more harmonious


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College detail


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The garden walkways, like so many areas of town, benefit from huge straggling trees


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Juan Ponce de Leon arrived at this point in 1513 - the discovery of Florida. This statue stands at one end of the two block long Plaza de la Constitution that commemorates this event


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The 1825 Trinity Parish Church Episcopal stands along the south side of the plaza. The Church of England was established on this site during the English ownership of Florida, 1763-1783, with services held in the Spanish Bishop's house that stood on this site


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Governor Gonzalo Mendez de Canzo built a house at the west end of the plaza in 1598. By royal decree, all Spanish towns had to have a central plaza with buildings, such as the church, government house and market facing on to it. The current building dates from the early 18th century


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St Augustine Cathedral on the north side of the square. The parish of St Augustine began in 1565 although this church was not built until the 1790s. In 1870 it was elevated to a cathedral and shortly after was severely damaged by fire. Restored in 1888 and 1965


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The cathedral interior is quite simple and nicely decorated


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A side chapel


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The high altar and choir showing the organ installation and the ornate wall decorations


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The decorations are echoed at the opposite end of the building with paintings depicting notable past events. Pictures are used extensively in churches to accommodate to the reinforcement needs of a largely illiterate congregation


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Next to the cathedral is this eyesore. It is currently occupied by Wachovia and was probably selected by their investment team as poor as their judgment has been of late


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South of Constitution square there are a few more blocks of "old town" with varying degrees of authenticity. Overall however, a relaxing and attractive place to while away a few hours


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Aviles Street, named after the hometown of the founder of St Augustine, largely comprises buildings around 200 years old. Here, the cross street is Artillery Lane


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Again, there is a profusion of architectural styles along the streets as new buildings have been constructed in the then current fashion


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This is a memorial to the Minorican laborers contracted by the Spaniards and brought to Florida from various parts of Europe. Almost wiped out by early hard times, the survivors congregated in St Augustine and, among other things, have enriched the local cuisine


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From Constitution Square, one can cross the Matanzas River by way of the Bridge of Lions to reach the outer banks. Here stands the 1874 St Augustine lighthouse about which, many ghost stories abound. You'll hear as many versions of the truth as people you ask so, like most local legends, you would be better off with a cold one


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Back on the mainland at the north end of old town, lies the Castillo de San Marcos, the local fort. Here, a collection of cannon barrels catch some rays, no longer needed in defense of the town


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Looking to the east, the intra-coastal waterway is open to the Atlantic at this point, hence the need for the fortifications


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In what was originally the moat, before being rendered obsolete by technology, stands this Hot Shot Furnace. Such furnaces were used to heat cannon balls to cherry red before firing, with the purpose of setting the targets - wooden ships - on fire. Nerds should Wiki Heated_Shot


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The Nuestra Senora da la Leche y Buen Parto (Our Lady of the Milk and Happy Delivery) chapel, celebrating the patroness of mothers and mothers-to-be, was first built in 1615


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The interior is pretty Spartan. It was rebuilt after destruction by war and rebuilt again following a pirate pillage. Next it was wiped out by a storm and built for the fourth time in 1918


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St Joseph the Worker, spouse of the Virgin Mary, spends his time standing in the yard looking dejected. Doesn't this guy look like a liberal to you?


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Shortly after the Spanish first landed they rushed to the local Home Depot for supplies to build this "Rustic Altar". Father Francisco Lopez de Mendoza Grajales, Fleet Chaplain, then performed a mass of thanksgiving


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Elsewhere around town, we couldn't help wondering which of these two sorry souls was actually in charge of proceedings. With temperatures in the nineties and humidity to match, it was a tough day to be trolling about


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This little guy, on the other hand, was full of energy and I swear would have eaten my leg if he'd been unleashed. The minders, who volunteered that they slept with the mutt each night, were happy to tell us this was his best day since his most recent flea infestation. Glad he's feeling better
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