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New Orleans
April 6, 2008
Pete's Pics > New Orleans
Post Katrina New Orleans
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From the camp site the first feature is actually a vacant Winn-Dixie grocery store. Beyond that is Basin Street Station which is now a Tourist Information Office.


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Just south of Basin Street Station is the oldest original church, Our Lady of Guadalupe built in 1826, on Rampart Street. There are older churches in town but they have been rebuilt over the years. This church served as the Mortuary Chapel for victims of yellow fever and is close to the oldest cemetary in town.


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The church interior is quite plain but does contain a relic of Saint Jude and a Shrine, to the left of the altar, has been maintained since the 1930s


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Behind the church is Saint Louis Cemetary No. 1, the oldest in New Orleans. If you have been bad lately, you will probably be able to see the Devil's Daughter on the right, inviting you in


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These above ground cemetaries have been featured in numerous movies and are the preferred choice in the area. This is due to the tendency of buried coffins to float to the surface after each heavy rain


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There are plent of posh memorials in the place, presumably kept up by surviving family members


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Here it seems, the last person in the family died and was popped inside as usual leaving nobody to do the maintenance. Still, I don't suppose the inhabitants are too concerned


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Another great benefit of warehousing the dead this way is that you can stack 'em as high as you like and save a ton of space. This looks like a prototype filing cabinet approach


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An obvious extension of the original filing cabinet design. This style is also known as an oven vault for obvious reasons


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Having worked the bugs out with the early models, grand marble filing cabinets were subsequently constructed for the rich and deceased


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This magnificent design however, seems better suited to families that tend to have small feet in order that they will all fit at the center


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The New Orleans area was predominently Catholic, from the early French influence, but a small area of this cemetary was set aside for those of the Protestant faith. Here lie two English born yellow fever victims


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Without their ubiquitous balconies, most French Quarter streets would hardly rise to the level of really dull


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My, my, here is a cosy traditional bar that simply begs to be ignored


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Practically every retail establishment is a bar or a burger joint or both.


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We couldn't determne whether this spiffy little emporium has been damaged by Katrina or was just washed up here by the storm. It does advertize VOODOO so I guess it must be authentic


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The atmosphere is like a continuous Spring Break for dropouts and deadbeats alike. Most bars were offering "Three for the price of one" in their attempts to separate punters from their money. At least there is a good inventory of balconies to jump from


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Oh wow, they offer carriage rides as well! How enterprising.


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Have we been here before?


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What's not to like?


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This is the crescent, a bend in the Mississippi river, that gives rise to the name Crescent City. New Orleans was named after the Duke of Orleans, Regent of France, in 1718. New Orleans is a major inland port, 110 milesfrom the mouth of the Mississippi River and more than forty miles from the Gulf of Mexico. It has an elevation below the high tide mark


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Facing the river is the Jackson Square Park


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In the center of the park Major General Andew Jackson still rides high


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At the far side of the park from the river is St Louis Cathedral


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Right next to the Cathedral is the Cabildo, the Louisana State Museum


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One of the world's undiscovered talents hamming it up in the area called Moon Walk by the crescent levee


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The suave garb of this forlorn pair far outstripped their musical performance. Only a mother could love them


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This group at least produced recognizable sounds even if their make up was unconventional


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I suppose it was inevitable that an effigy of Joan of Arc, the Maid of Orleans, would make an appearance. This one is in the French Market area and I suppose the connection is that they were both once French? Eh bien.


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Talking of the French Market, much of this area has been rebuilt in Neo Flea Market style. Functional, but powerfully bland


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An array of bona fide artifacts drawn from all parts of the third world


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A corner of the French Market that has so far escaped improvement. Long may it be overlooked
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